Agenda

Pick up your badge, grab a coffee and be prepared for first class content

Uxolo was established to bridge the gap between private capital providers, Development Finance Institutions (DFIs), and governments seeking to invest in development finance projects. We offer you the latest news, data, research, and impact focussed events! This event was designed to bring investors and DFIs together to mobilise capital into development finance projects. We bring together the whole development finance ecosystem to serve you, build your network and to get your projects done! 



Sam McManus
Director, Uxolo

Navigating one's way through the development finance ecosystem is a challenge to say the least. Development projects and initiatives are owned by different governments, many stakeholders, with differing views, strategies and cultures. It has been said that many development institutions are not up to the challenge of crowding in private capital or tackling modern challenges. They operate in a complex manner and simplification would speed up execution. On the contrary, shouldn't multilateral development banks (MDBs) be expected to deliberate carefully over vast amounts of investment capital? Yet the challenges do not end here. More attention should be directed at supporting bilateral and local development finance institutions and not just coercing MDBs to spend money fast! Hear how our industry leaders are responding to what's going on the market. Listen to a variety of perspectives here!

Which sectors, regions and countries are our DFIs currently looking at?

What are the key challenges and priorities that DFIs face when securing financing for key projects?

How can the development industry support bilateral and local DFIs?

How can DFIs work with the private sector to mobilise capital where its needed most?

Kofi Asumadu Addo
Head, Guarantees & Specialised Finance, Afreximbank
Daniel Borrego Cubero
Head, Debt Mobilisation Product Development at EBRD, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)
Ope Onibokun
Investment Director - Infrastructure & Climate , British International Investment (BII)
Dietske Simons
Director Finance, Impact & Data (FMO), Co-chair supervisory board (JIM), FMO Development Bank & Joint Impact Model Foundation
Moderator
Simon Bessant
Director, Texel Finance Ltd.

Directing foreign investment into emerging markets is a complex endeavour. Governments desire investment and enact policies to reel foreign investors in. But like all partnerships, they involve give and take. Emerging markets risk losing control of their economies if capital controls are inadequate. On the contrary, investors flee from emerging markets if capital controls are too tight! Most fundamentally, investors retreat from emerging markets through real or perceived political instability. Western investors want functioning legal systems, accountability, transparency and speed of execution. But there must be political will to facilitate change. To promote investment, developing countries must develop capital markets, hedge risks and provide liquid instruments to assist projects. But these market developments can occur amidst dissent. Local citizens must not feel disenfranchised from ongoing developments otherwise they are unlikely to support their own governments long enough for investments to generate returns. Education and training  around projects and new technologies must be provided to facilitate democratic stability. Ideally there should be political consensus to sustain long-term projects which may exceed several terms. This session will interrogate these challenges, examine how to create an attractive investment climate and best serve local people.

Examining the data and changing the perceptions of risky markets

Create incentives for Blended Finance and Public Private Partnerships

Increasing transparency, accountability and the speed of execution 

Ensuring that local citizens are stakeholders of development projects

Leticia Ferreras
Portfolio Manager, Allianz Global Investors
Alix Peterson Zwane
CEO, Global Innovation Fund
Moderator
Victoria Miles
Founding Partner, ImpactA Global

Stop for a short break! Mix and mingle with industry leaders and practitioners

Plenary

Many stakeholders in impact finance would agree on the value of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). However, the incentives between public and private actors are not always harmonious.  Organisational challenges are but one example of the incentive problems encountered by public and private partners. These include a lack of clarity of agreements  on risk and responsibility sharing, inadequate procedures for resolving disputes between parties, and the absence of agreements on dealing with large profits and the risks of failure. Despite an expenditure of $2.5 trillion per year on railways, roads, ports and water projects, countries around the world have fallen short of much needed PPP investment. This session will reconsider PPPs and how the development industry can marry up the incentives between public and private actors for more fruitful partnerships. 

Understanding the character of  a PPP against your objectives

How can DFI's assist in the procurement process of PPPs?

What are some common problems encountered with PPPs?

How can we overcome PPP challenges to build lasting partnerships?

·      

Paul Horrocks
Head of Unit for Private Finance for Sustainable Development, OECD
Avinash Mishra
Managing Director, Global Innovation Fund
Stéphanie Émond
Chief Impact Officer, FinDev Canada
Antonio Mena
Senior Finance Manager , Bechtel
Moderator
Christian Novak
Global Head of Blended Finance, Delphos

Workshop

The UK government’s MOBILIST programme has curated a panel that blends private sector investors and fund managers with leading European DFI representatives and MOBILIST representatives. The panel will discuss new financial approaches for recycling and redirecting DFI capital through innovative partnerships with public market actors. Industry delegates will hear:

Experts discuss pioneering pathways for DFIs and MDBs to mobilise capital through sustainable exits to private sector investors

The potential of public markets in unlocking development finance and commercial returns

The benefits of specific listed and public market structures in helping DFIs and MDBs raise capital and investment 

How public market actors, DFIs and MDBs can partner to leverage underexploited emerging and frontier market listen market opportunities

 

Plenary

In the face of the current global energy crisis the green energy transition has become even more complicated. Shouldn't the developed world be leading the way? And even so, who should access fossil fuels in the meantime? There are two probable impacts of the energy crisis. Oil importing nations will strengthen their resolve to create renewable alternatives reducing their oil dependency. Oil rich nations will utilise their oil endowments to facilitate growth. Some industry leaders have stated that the transition must be a "just transition." Emerging markets should not be forced into untenable renewable investment in the short-run. Nonetheless, some exploration into renewable energy is not unreasonable. We all need more fuel and would be much better off working together. This session will explore how collaboration of Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) and the private sector can smoothen this bumpy transition.

Different energy transition pathways for countries in the global north and south

Should developing countries use untapped fossil fuel reserves?

Scaling catalytic capital for investment in the renewable energy sector

Carbon accounting methods on our journey to net zero

Sumeet Manchanda
Associate Director, Lead Climate Co-Finance, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)
Jan Malan
Investment Director , British International Investment (BII)
Moderator
Charlotte Hampshire
Director, BPL Global

Workshop

Environmental and Social Governance (ESG) is a complex topic. There is little consensus on what the term really means! This has led to a lack of coherence in ESG projects. In Europe there have been efforts to formulate taxonomies. These efforts should quite rightly continue and even incorporate measures such as carbon accounting. Aside from moral questions regarding the universalization of European standards upon developing countries, there are yet other pitfalls. Any imposition of rigid impact metrics upon emerging markets is unfair and unrealistic especially in the near future. Despite this, steps must be taken forward and expanded into impact finance ensuring that environmental, socioeconomic equality is measurable in the long run. This discussion will consider how  to universalise a standardised ESG taxonomy in a progressive fashion. Gradualism will provide developing nations the time needed for adoption. 

Defining realistic benchmarks and committing to ESG goals

Which kinds of tools are available to measure ESG performance?

How can we alter the perverse incentives for greenwashing?

What can be done when falling short of ESG targets?

Martin Gauss
Head of Unit, Development Policy, OeEB - Oesterreichische Entwicklungsbank
Julia Wakeling Bird
Head of Impact and ESG, SilverStreet Capital Llp
Phil Davis
Director of ESG at Helios Investment Partners, Helios Group
Moderator
Wee Kii Teh
Associate Portfolio Manager, Allianz Global Investors

We invite the leading deal makers of development finance to give you key takeaway points!

Hesham Zakai
Managing Director, TXF-delete
Sam McManus
Director, Uxolo

Fuel up because our journey isn't over yet!

Plenary

One of the toughest lessons learned from the Russia-Ukraine crisis, is how vulnerable the continent is to food insecurity. With roughly 85% wheat coming from Russia-Ukraine, it is not only agricultural imports that have been affected. Fertilisers have become unaffordable to many African farmers. The effect on the price of wheat, barely, corn and sunflower oil has been monumental. Protests against the surges in food and fuel prices have bubbled over in Africa and the Middle East. Governments have been scrambling around over how they should respond. After a rare diplomatic breakthrough, Ankara and the United Nations have brokered a grain and fertilizer export agreement between Moscow and Kyiv. While the export agreement holds, Ankara expects one grain ship to leave Ukraine per day. Although a more permanent solution for Africa would be to progressively reduce import dependence. This session will examine the potential for boosting logistics and infrastructure within The African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) and will explore how impact investment can assist Africa in avoiding such challenges in future.

The coordination of energy and food demands during a crisis

Building intra-African logistics and supply chains for greater regional efficiency

Research and development into agricultural biotechnology and how investors can help

How can development financing support Intra-African trade facilitating projects?

Eduardo Oliveira
CEO, HOMT España S.A.
Samuel Mugoya
Director Syndications, Co-Financing and Client Solutions Department, African Development Bank (AfDB)
Duncan Vink
Joint Managing Director, Signature Agri Investments
Gorell Barnes
Founding Partner, Ocean 14 Capital

Workshop

Many would agree that capital would not naturally flow towards ethical investments without some form of government intervention. The same is evidenced by the continuation of traditional divisions of labour which has perpetuated social inequality in a modern world. This begs the question, what is the role of multilateral institutions in ensuring that private capital is directed towards gender,  inclusion and socioeconomic equality? Perhaps there is no definitive answer on the exact role of multilaterals here. However, we can acknowledge that women play an integral role in global production, including food, goods, services and ranges from work in fields, factories, to managing global corporations. Although women's roles differ considerably across developed and developing markets, exclusion from the ownership and control of land has hindered the achievement of the sustainable development goals. Evidently, capital must be steered to where it is needed most! This workshop will evaluate the best practices for steering capital towards ethical causes, ensuring that impact investment is more than a buzzword!

Ensuring that investment proposals are explicit about gender and financial inclusion

Which kinds of technical assistance are available to enhance social equality?

Supporting women-led firms and female entrepreneurship

Linking ethical investment performance indicators for long-term change

Tara Collier
Strategic Advisor, Moblist
Catherine Godschalk
VP Investments, Calvert Impact Capital
Isabella da Costa Mendes
Founding Partner at ImpactA Global, ImpactA Global
Camilla Nestor
CEO, MCE Social Capital
Moderator
Jessica Brown
Content Manager, Uxolo

Plenary

Every debt crisis results in severe restrictions on investment in infrastructure, education and healthcare and brings lasting setbacks on the growth of impacted countries. Developing markets have had to wrestle with the three C's, COVID, Climate and Conflict! The triple whammy has placed cumulative burdens on governments. The challenge reinforces the increasing relevance of debt sustainability. As COVID ravaged through the year 2021, developing country external debt stocks reached $11.1 trillion, which is more than double the amount of the $4.1 trillion debt registered in 2009.  The tyrannous trifecta has led to the climate agenda being pitted against the development agenda, particularly in emerging markets. Ideally, governments shouldn't be faced with a binary choice. Nonetheless, difficult decisions must be made. The conundrum reinforces the significance of what economists call opportunity cost, or the loss of available choices when a particular choice is chosen. This workshop will interrogate how development financiers can provide the much needed support for developing country governments. So tell me, when was the last time that you checked your post-pandemic purse? 

Inflation, the rising cost of borrowing and sovereign debt

Rising interest rates and the increasingly expensive import bill

Uncovering the available support for emerging markets under budgetary constraints 

Zsoka Koczan
Associate Director, Senior Economist, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)

Workshop

With food security back on the agenda, agriculture must be boosted to fill the shortfall of Ukrainian imports. Producers and exporters from countries like Brazil and Columbia will need to step in. Although, increased food production requires more energy. The region is dependent on fossil fuels. But with boundless sunshine and endless sea breeze, there are openings to seize solar power and grasp the wind! Opportunities exist for investment in agriculture, renewables, infrastructure and regional transportation. The Blue Economy of the Caribbean project had $56 million of financing approved by the World Bank. Objectives include financing Micro, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (MSME's), increasing access to fisheries risk insurance, strengthening coastal resilience, and greater regional collaboration. Columbia's Green Movil electric bus fleet project may potentially create opportunities for commercial banks to enhance the expanding e-bus sector. Governments seek to replace diesel to meet sustainability targets. This workshop will examine how best to mobilise private capital, enhance regional connectivity, productivity and food security. 

Initiatives to attract private capital to Latin America and the Caribbean

How ECA’s can support agricultural exporters?

Sovereign debt and the challenge of borrowing in U.S dollars

Infrastructural investment and regional telecommunication

Luiscela Moreno Jiménez
Senior Investment Manager, Private Sector & Trade Finance, OPEC Fund for International Development (OPEC Fund)
Tatiana Nikiforova
Managing Director, Delphos

It's been a wonderful journey. Thank you for joining us and remember our name is Uxolo!

Search results

Pick up your badge, grab a coffee and be prepared for first class content

Uxolo was established to bridge the gap between private capital providers, Development Finance Institutions (DFIs), and governments seeking to invest in development finance projects. We offer you the latest news, data, research, and impact focussed events! This event was designed to bring investors and DFIs together to mobilise capital into development finance projects. We bring together the whole development finance ecosystem to serve you, build your network and to get your projects done! 



Sam McManus
Director, Uxolo

Navigating one's way through the development finance ecosystem is a challenge to say the least. Development projects and initiatives are owned by different governments, many stakeholders, with differing views, strategies and cultures. It has been said that many development institutions are not up to the challenge of crowding in private capital or tackling modern challenges. They operate in a complex manner and simplification would speed up execution. On the contrary, shouldn't multilateral development banks (MDBs) be expected to deliberate carefully over vast amounts of investment capital? Yet the challenges do not end here. More attention should be directed at supporting bilateral and local development finance institutions and not just coercing MDBs to spend money fast! Hear how our industry leaders are responding to what's going on the market. Listen to a variety of perspectives here!

Which sectors, regions and countries are our DFIs currently looking at?

What are the key challenges and priorities that DFIs face when securing financing for key projects?

How can the development industry support bilateral and local DFIs?

How can DFIs work with the private sector to mobilise capital where its needed most?

Kofi Asumadu Addo
Head, Guarantees & Specialised Finance, Afreximbank
Daniel Borrego Cubero
Head, Debt Mobilisation Product Development at EBRD, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)
Ope Onibokun
Investment Director - Infrastructure & Climate , British International Investment (BII)
Dietske Simons
Director Finance, Impact & Data (FMO), Co-chair supervisory board (JIM), FMO Development Bank & Joint Impact Model Foundation
Moderator
Simon Bessant
Director, Texel Finance Ltd.

Directing foreign investment into emerging markets is a complex endeavour. Governments desire investment and enact policies to reel foreign investors in. But like all partnerships, they involve give and take. Emerging markets risk losing control of their economies if capital controls are inadequate. On the contrary, investors flee from emerging markets if capital controls are too tight! Most fundamentally, investors retreat from emerging markets through real or perceived political instability. Western investors want functioning legal systems, accountability, transparency and speed of execution. But there must be political will to facilitate change. To promote investment, developing countries must develop capital markets, hedge risks and provide liquid instruments to assist projects. But these market developments can occur amidst dissent. Local citizens must not feel disenfranchised from ongoing developments otherwise they are unlikely to support their own governments long enough for investments to generate returns. Education and training  around projects and new technologies must be provided to facilitate democratic stability. Ideally there should be political consensus to sustain long-term projects which may exceed several terms. This session will interrogate these challenges, examine how to create an attractive investment climate and best serve local people.

Examining the data and changing the perceptions of risky markets

Create incentives for Blended Finance and Public Private Partnerships

Increasing transparency, accountability and the speed of execution 

Ensuring that local citizens are stakeholders of development projects

Leticia Ferreras
Portfolio Manager, Allianz Global Investors
Alix Peterson Zwane
CEO, Global Innovation Fund
Moderator
Victoria Miles
Founding Partner, ImpactA Global

Stop for a short break! Mix and mingle with industry leaders and practitioners

Many stakeholders in impact finance would agree on the value of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). However, the incentives between public and private actors are not always harmonious.  Organisational challenges are but one example of the incentive problems encountered by public and private partners. These include a lack of clarity of agreements  on risk and responsibility sharing, inadequate procedures for resolving disputes between parties, and the absence of agreements on dealing with large profits and the risks of failure. Despite an expenditure of $2.5 trillion per year on railways, roads, ports and water projects, countries around the world have fallen short of much needed PPP investment. This session will reconsider PPPs and how the development industry can marry up the incentives between public and private actors for more fruitful partnerships. 

Understanding the character of  a PPP against your objectives

How can DFI's assist in the procurement process of PPPs?

What are some common problems encountered with PPPs?

How can we overcome PPP challenges to build lasting partnerships?

·      

Paul Horrocks
Head of Unit for Private Finance for Sustainable Development, OECD
Avinash Mishra
Managing Director, Global Innovation Fund
Stéphanie Émond
Chief Impact Officer, FinDev Canada
Antonio Mena
Senior Finance Manager , Bechtel
Moderator
Christian Novak
Global Head of Blended Finance, Delphos

In the face of the current global energy crisis the green energy transition has become even more complicated. Shouldn't the developed world be leading the way? And even so, who should access fossil fuels in the meantime? There are two probable impacts of the energy crisis. Oil importing nations will strengthen their resolve to create renewable alternatives reducing their oil dependency. Oil rich nations will utilise their oil endowments to facilitate growth. Some industry leaders have stated that the transition must be a "just transition." Emerging markets should not be forced into untenable renewable investment in the short-run. Nonetheless, some exploration into renewable energy is not unreasonable. We all need more fuel and would be much better off working together. This session will explore how collaboration of Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) and the private sector can smoothen this bumpy transition.

Different energy transition pathways for countries in the global north and south

Should developing countries use untapped fossil fuel reserves?

Scaling catalytic capital for investment in the renewable energy sector

Carbon accounting methods on our journey to net zero

Sumeet Manchanda
Associate Director, Lead Climate Co-Finance, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)
Jan Malan
Investment Director , British International Investment (BII)
Moderator
Charlotte Hampshire
Director, BPL Global

We invite the leading deal makers of development finance to give you key takeaway points!

Hesham Zakai
Managing Director, TXF-delete
Sam McManus
Director, Uxolo

Fuel up because our journey isn't over yet!

One of the toughest lessons learned from the Russia-Ukraine crisis, is how vulnerable the continent is to food insecurity. With roughly 85% wheat coming from Russia-Ukraine, it is not only agricultural imports that have been affected. Fertilisers have become unaffordable to many African farmers. The effect on the price of wheat, barely, corn and sunflower oil has been monumental. Protests against the surges in food and fuel prices have bubbled over in Africa and the Middle East. Governments have been scrambling around over how they should respond. After a rare diplomatic breakthrough, Ankara and the United Nations have brokered a grain and fertilizer export agreement between Moscow and Kyiv. While the export agreement holds, Ankara expects one grain ship to leave Ukraine per day. Although a more permanent solution for Africa would be to progressively reduce import dependence. This session will examine the potential for boosting logistics and infrastructure within The African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) and will explore how impact investment can assist Africa in avoiding such challenges in future.

The coordination of energy and food demands during a crisis

Building intra-African logistics and supply chains for greater regional efficiency

Research and development into agricultural biotechnology and how investors can help

How can development financing support Intra-African trade facilitating projects?

Eduardo Oliveira
CEO, HOMT España S.A.
Samuel Mugoya
Director Syndications, Co-Financing and Client Solutions Department, African Development Bank (AfDB)
Duncan Vink
Joint Managing Director, Signature Agri Investments
Gorell Barnes
Founding Partner, Ocean 14 Capital

Every debt crisis results in severe restrictions on investment in infrastructure, education and healthcare and brings lasting setbacks on the growth of impacted countries. Developing markets have had to wrestle with the three C's, COVID, Climate and Conflict! The triple whammy has placed cumulative burdens on governments. The challenge reinforces the increasing relevance of debt sustainability. As COVID ravaged through the year 2021, developing country external debt stocks reached $11.1 trillion, which is more than double the amount of the $4.1 trillion debt registered in 2009.  The tyrannous trifecta has led to the climate agenda being pitted against the development agenda, particularly in emerging markets. Ideally, governments shouldn't be faced with a binary choice. Nonetheless, difficult decisions must be made. The conundrum reinforces the significance of what economists call opportunity cost, or the loss of available choices when a particular choice is chosen. This workshop will interrogate how development financiers can provide the much needed support for developing country governments. So tell me, when was the last time that you checked your post-pandemic purse? 

Inflation, the rising cost of borrowing and sovereign debt

Rising interest rates and the increasingly expensive import bill

Uncovering the available support for emerging markets under budgetary constraints 

Zsoka Koczan
Associate Director, Senior Economist, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)

It's been a wonderful journey. Thank you for joining us and remember our name is Uxolo!

The UK government’s MOBILIST programme has curated a panel that blends private sector investors and fund managers with leading European DFI representatives and MOBILIST representatives. The panel will discuss new financial approaches for recycling and redirecting DFI capital through innovative partnerships with public market actors. Industry delegates will hear:

Experts discuss pioneering pathways for DFIs and MDBs to mobilise capital through sustainable exits to private sector investors

The potential of public markets in unlocking development finance and commercial returns

The benefits of specific listed and public market structures in helping DFIs and MDBs raise capital and investment 

How public market actors, DFIs and MDBs can partner to leverage underexploited emerging and frontier market listen market opportunities

 

Environmental and Social Governance (ESG) is a complex topic. There is little consensus on what the term really means! This has led to a lack of coherence in ESG projects. In Europe there have been efforts to formulate taxonomies. These efforts should quite rightly continue and even incorporate measures such as carbon accounting. Aside from moral questions regarding the universalization of European standards upon developing countries, there are yet other pitfalls. Any imposition of rigid impact metrics upon emerging markets is unfair and unrealistic especially in the near future. Despite this, steps must be taken forward and expanded into impact finance ensuring that environmental, socioeconomic equality is measurable in the long run. This discussion will consider how  to universalise a standardised ESG taxonomy in a progressive fashion. Gradualism will provide developing nations the time needed for adoption. 

Defining realistic benchmarks and committing to ESG goals

Which kinds of tools are available to measure ESG performance?

How can we alter the perverse incentives for greenwashing?

What can be done when falling short of ESG targets?

Martin Gauss
Head of Unit, Development Policy, OeEB - Oesterreichische Entwicklungsbank
Julia Wakeling Bird
Head of Impact and ESG, SilverStreet Capital Llp
Phil Davis
Director of ESG at Helios Investment Partners, Helios Group
Moderator
Wee Kii Teh
Associate Portfolio Manager, Allianz Global Investors

Many would agree that capital would not naturally flow towards ethical investments without some form of government intervention. The same is evidenced by the continuation of traditional divisions of labour which has perpetuated social inequality in a modern world. This begs the question, what is the role of multilateral institutions in ensuring that private capital is directed towards gender,  inclusion and socioeconomic equality? Perhaps there is no definitive answer on the exact role of multilaterals here. However, we can acknowledge that women play an integral role in global production, including food, goods, services and ranges from work in fields, factories, to managing global corporations. Although women's roles differ considerably across developed and developing markets, exclusion from the ownership and control of land has hindered the achievement of the sustainable development goals. Evidently, capital must be steered to where it is needed most! This workshop will evaluate the best practices for steering capital towards ethical causes, ensuring that impact investment is more than a buzzword!

Ensuring that investment proposals are explicit about gender and financial inclusion

Which kinds of technical assistance are available to enhance social equality?

Supporting women-led firms and female entrepreneurship

Linking ethical investment performance indicators for long-term change

Tara Collier
Strategic Advisor, Moblist
Catherine Godschalk
VP Investments, Calvert Impact Capital
Isabella da Costa Mendes
Founding Partner at ImpactA Global, ImpactA Global
Camilla Nestor
CEO, MCE Social Capital
Moderator
Jessica Brown
Content Manager, Uxolo

With food security back on the agenda, agriculture must be boosted to fill the shortfall of Ukrainian imports. Producers and exporters from countries like Brazil and Columbia will need to step in. Although, increased food production requires more energy. The region is dependent on fossil fuels. But with boundless sunshine and endless sea breeze, there are openings to seize solar power and grasp the wind! Opportunities exist for investment in agriculture, renewables, infrastructure and regional transportation. The Blue Economy of the Caribbean project had $56 million of financing approved by the World Bank. Objectives include financing Micro, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (MSME's), increasing access to fisheries risk insurance, strengthening coastal resilience, and greater regional collaboration. Columbia's Green Movil electric bus fleet project may potentially create opportunities for commercial banks to enhance the expanding e-bus sector. Governments seek to replace diesel to meet sustainability targets. This workshop will examine how best to mobilise private capital, enhance regional connectivity, productivity and food security. 

Initiatives to attract private capital to Latin America and the Caribbean

How ECA’s can support agricultural exporters?

Sovereign debt and the challenge of borrowing in U.S dollars

Infrastructural investment and regional telecommunication

Luiscela Moreno Jiménez
Senior Investment Manager, Private Sector & Trade Finance, OPEC Fund for International Development (OPEC Fund)
Tatiana Nikiforova
Managing Director, Delphos